In an index, the former work might be written "Comedy of Errors, The", with the article moved to the end. See Weak and strong forms in English. For example, Give me some apples, Give me some water (equivalent to the singular countable forms an apple and a glass of water). The articles in English are the definite article the and the indefinite articles a and an.The definite article is used when the speaker believes that the listener knows the identity of the noun's referent (because it is obvious, because it is common knowledge, or because it was mentioned in the same sentence or an earlier sentence). English has three articles: A, AN, and THE. Some can also be used with singular countable nouns, as in There is some person on the porch, which implies that the identity of the person is unknown to the speaker (which is not necessarily the case when a(n) is used). These articles are used before nouns to show whether the nouns are general or specific. Both a and an are usually pronounced with a schwa: /ə/, /ən/. The indefinite article is used when the speaker believes that the listener does not have to be told the identity of the referent. In 1916, Legros & Grant included in their classic printers' handbook Typographical Printing-Surfaces, a proposal for a letter similar to Ħ to represent "Th", thus abbreviating "the" to ħe. ��& � _rels/.rels �(� ���J1�����Ͷ��4ۋ���0&����?$Si��؃���3�o��77�J��`Y� ��`����O�{���'Gʰi���/4"��Rf=��\�H�t��r9�^F��ؓ\���L��L�bk����#��-1d�:$Z�T�۲�h1�� [12], This article is about grammatical articles in English. The definite article the is used when the referent of the noun phrase is assumed to be unique or known from the context. These articles are used before nouns to show … Where the next word begins with a consonant sound, a is used. The definite article ‘the’.. You use the indefinite article‘a’ or ‘an’when you talk about something for the first time.After that, you use the definite article‘the’, for example:. Some can also have a more emphatic meaning: "some but not others" or "some but not many". The definite article is used when the speaker believes that the listener knows the identity of the noun's referent (because it is obvious, because it is common knowledge, or because it was mentioned in the same sentence or an earlier sentence). The form an is used before words starting with a vowel sound, regardless of whether the word begins with a vowel letter. ի�. '�!���rrcTGC�\G�c�ε�ʄp:����ÿ ��C��gh�'����~�pcw%x_uGz������Ų�e�A���j?�)L9�1��o8�0N���¸ES��c [1] The most common determiners are the articles the and a(n), which specify the presence or absence of definiteness of the noun. However, when stressed (which is rare in ordinary speech), they are normally pronounced respectively as /eɪ/ (to rhyme with day) and /æn/ (to rhyme with pan).